Dance on “Camino de Santiago”

Dance on the street

Specific bases

€ 13,000 cash prizes

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Dates: from July 20 to 21, 2019

Place: Various populations of the Camino de Santiago as it passes through Burgos and its province.

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ORGANIZE

The Foundation VIII Centenario Catedral Burgos 2021 and the International Choreography Competition Burgos - New York

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Essays in the spaces: from July 16 to 19.

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DATES COMPETITION

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Contest July 20: Redecilla del Camino at 7:00 p.m. and San Juan de Ortega at 8:30 p.m.

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Contest July 21: Castrojeriz at 7:00 pm

and Monastery of San Juan (Burgos) 8:30 pm. The 4 choreographers will compete every day.

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Each choreographer will receive € 3,000 for the finalist and for having been selected from among all the submitted works.

The winner will receive € 1,000 more, that is € 4,000.

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A popular jury will publicly decide who is the winning choreographer each day and in each space. At the end of the fourth day it will be decided which choreographer has obtained the greatest number of spaces won. In the event of a tie, the representative assigned by the VIII Centenario Catedral Burgos 2021 Foundation will decide.

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The organization of the contest will make available to the public and interested jury of 2 buses that will leave from the Plaza de España at 6:30 p.m. on the days of the contest.

The choreographic contest "Dance in Camino de Santiago” seeks to promote the art of choreography and therefore the creative values that emerge in the world panorama of the Dance of the XXI Century and taking as an inspiring model the Jacobean Route as it passes through the province of Burgos .

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This choreographic contest offers us a vision of heritage, culture and the avant-garde through the art of dance, whose main driving force is the Camino de Santiago.

The potential of this route is visible in its stories and legends, in its places and people, in the interaction between space and time and above all in the inspiration of the proposed places that will serve as "muse" to the creator of dance.

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The winning work of "Danza en el Camino", along with the winning work of "Dancing with stones" and the winners of Contemporary and Urban Dance will have their final exhibition and gala at the Ruins of the Roman Theater of Clunia, on Saturday, July 27 from 2019, at 10:30 p.m.

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THE CONTEST

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The choreographers must submit a video sketch of the choreography showing the style and the choreographic line, taking into account that they must adapt the initial sketch to each space and theme. The choreographers will have from Tuesday 16 to Friday 19 to work in the 4 spaces and be able to perform "live" the adjustments of their work to adapt them to the theme of the population. Also the days of the contest, from 20 to 21, will have all the morning to finalize.

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Only 4 works in competition will be admitted, each work competing in the 4 selected spaces and with a maximum duration of 10 minutes and a minimum of 8. The works can be from one dancer to a maximum of 6.

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The 4 selected choreographers will receive a total of € 3,000 in selected choreography, the winner designated by the audience along with three representatives of the Foundation VIII Centenario will decide which choreography is the winner and will receive € 1,000 more in concept of "Choreographer winner of Dance in the path".

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This choreography must be present at the Winners Gala to be held in the ruins of the Clunia Roman Theater on Saturday, July 27.

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The versatility of the choreographer will be taken into account when adapting his work to each place and the work developed in the field of work and its impact on the population through its people who can be part of the popular jury that will be present in each population.

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In the section "material to choreograph" is the documentation relating to the place and facts that occurred in it in order to be taken into account to create the work.

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You can also collect information from books, internet, municipal archives, etc ...

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The participation of this contest implies the acceptance of these bases and the general bases

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The winning choreographer of this 2019 edition must be present at the winning choreography gala on Saturday July 27 at the Roman Ruins of the Clunia Theater, along with the other winners of the different categories. The economic conditions of this gala will be agreed with the organization of the Bu- Ny Contest.

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Competition places

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Space 1. Redecilla del Camino, beginning of the Camino de Santiago as it passes through Burgos

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Space 2. San Juan de Ortega. Monastery and Gothic church

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Space 3. Ruins of the Convent of San Antón, Castrojeriz, Burgos

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Space 4. Interior Monastery of San Juan, Plaza de San Juan, Burgos

Material for choreography

Space nº 1.- REDECILLA DEL CAMINO

Beginning of the Camino de Santiago as it passes through Burgos

 

El Camino penetrated the current province of Burgos from Grañón (La Rioja), through the municipality of Redecilla del Camino, village that until today preserves in its own name the memory of the Via Jacobea that even configured its urban layout physically, ordered all of it along the Camino, with a prolonged main street of 450 meters in length and other minors parallel to it. Two arches or passageways marked the beginning and end of this street designated as Calle Mayor, which was closed with two known doors from east to west, such as Puerta Cimera and Puerta Bajera, both are now gone.

In the same street Mayor is the parochial church of Santa Maria of the Street, and in front of the church in this street Mayor, at number 29, was the hospital of San Lazaro, whose memory has survived to this day, and which has been restored and dedicated to pilgrim hostel. The existence of the hospital dates back to 1551 from the factory books of the parish.

This hospital was one of many hospitals with which each village attended the practice of charity for the poor and needy, according to the Cadastro de la Ensenada, it consisted of only three beds, two in the lower room for the sick or poor, and one in the upper room destined for some needy passerby clergyman; the dimensions of the same one were 7 varas of facade by 20 of bottom.

 

The income of the hospital, according to the same source, reached the figure of 78 fanegas of bread mediated wheat and barley and 66 reales, product of the rente of a barn and of an Obra Pia, located in the next place of Quintanar. The disentailment alienation of these goods in favor of the Public Treasury produced in the nineteenth century 8,710.11 pesetas that rented a theoretical interest of the 3%

There is no evidence that it was located in the area of Redecilla del Camino, or on the edge of the Jacobean route, the lodge mentioned in a diploma of Alfonso VIII, dated in Belorado on April 26, 1189. This lodge was located on the banks of the Peros River, which has been identified with the current Reláchigo, a river that crosses the Camino very near Redecilla.

This circumstance has moved some author, to locate the hostel in this place. But another document, three years earlier, referring to the same lodge, places us in Grañón on the banks of the river Peros and bordering with the caminus peregrinorum.

Nor was it located in Redecilla del Camino, but in the vicinity of Redecilla del Campo, the hospice of Santa Pia, which appears (1) mentioned in a diploma emilianense of August 6 of the year 1025 and that Luciano Serrano located in the Redecilla de la via Jacobean; we agree with this rejection of the hospice of Santa Pía, as of a hostel on the Camino, with Luciano Huidobro, since all the place names of the diploma identify the Redecilla, who is mentioned along with Santa Pía, as Redecilla del Campo. In the event that Santa Pía coincides with Santa Cristina, as Luciano Huidobro also supposes, this monastery would be the one cited in the year 1049 like Santa Cristina next to the Tirón river.

Ecclesiastically Redecilla del Camino always belonged to the bishopric of Calahorra, and was the village of the Jacobean route Burgos more abundant in hermitages. We know up to eleven hermitages, seven in the village or in its surroundings and four more in the term, namely: Santa María de Villareina, Our Lady of Ayago, San Martín de Villaorceros and Santa Engracia, the latter in the vicinity of San Martín de Villaorceros.

Villarreina and Villaorceros were two old population centers, now depopulated; of Villarreina no remains remain today and Villaorceros only a few ruins indicate the old location of the town; Santa Engracia was a hermitage of Villaorceros. Of Santa María de Ayago, although it still has a large church where pilgrims go on pilgrimage to Redecilla and some another neighboring town, we do not know that it was formerly a primitive nucleus of population. Since these four hermitages were very far from the Camino de Santiago, we dispense with them in this study.

The remaining seven hermitages whose memory has been preserved were under the patronage of San Esteban, San Nicolás, San Andrés, San Bartolomé, San Lázaro, San Roque and Santa Bárbara. Of them only the hermitage of San Roque is in foot, in the present cemetery, to the left of the highway.

The Camino de Santiago through the urban core ran along the Calle Mayor, from Puerta Cimera to La Bajera.

For the term of Redecilla del Camino, its route began at the provincial line along the still existing road from Grañón for some 830 meters; this road continued straight another 300 meters until crossing the highway later ...

Then, the Camino ... crossed the road and continued 400 meters parallel to it, very close to it, going in line straight to the Puerta Cimera through which it entered the town, having passed before the village between the road and the ruins of some walls.

Photo: Shrine of Santa María del Campo in Redecilla del Camino, Burgos

At the exit of the village, the Camino, which was called throughout its Camino Real route, goes towards the road, passing on the other side of it about 100 meters from the houses.A road very altered today by the land consolidation... In the village of Redecilla del Camino had to settle from very early francs immigrants because already around 1196 is designated as Rediziella Franks, but its existence is earlier since the year 1133 is mentioned as a stronghold that had as a tenente to such a Spanish... Its name does not derive from network or networks and much less from ripa or ribacilla. Its etymology is evident and comes from rates, with the meaning of forest or grove in its diminutive form.

The history of the town and its castle, as well as the description of its parochial temple, have been outlined by Luciano Huidobro. Vestiges of the historical importance of the town are the remains of the house-palace, the roll and fountain as well as the several mansions of the main street and the square.

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Texts: THE PATH OF SANTIAGO IN THE PROVINCE OF BURGOS

D. Gonzalo Martínez Díez / Editions of the Provincial Delegation of Burgos- 1998

★★★

Space nº 2.- SAN JUAN DE ORTEGA

Monastery and Gothic church

 

That place of the Way perpetuates in its name the memory of one of the two medieval saints who dedicated all their hacienda and their life to the physical conditioning of the route that the pilgrims followed and to the service of them; These two saints were Santo Domingo de la Calzada and San Juan de Ortega.

 

Juan de Ortega was born in Quintanaortuño, a village in the Ubierna Valley, 13 kilometers north of Burgos, around 1180, son Velazquez Knight, was ordained a priest, collaborating as a disciple with Santo Domingo de la Calzada in material and spiritual works that the Rioja saint performed in favor of the pilgrims.

 

Having died on May 12, 1109 his teacher, Santo Domingo de la Calzada, Juan de Quintanaortuño decided to undertake the pilgrimage to Jerusalem , Recovered by the Crusaders just ten years before. On the return trip he suffered a shipwreck in which he saved his life, attributing this favor to San Nicolás de Bari and promising build a church in honor of this saint.

 

Special difficulty represented on the Camino de Santiago the dangerous crossing of the Montes de Oca, frequent refuge of robbers; to facilitate this step the saint built his church, a monastery for him and his disciples, under the rule of the regular canons of San Agustín, and a hostel or hospital for the pilgrims in a place that had taken the name of Ortega, in Latin Urtica, for the abundance of nettles or weeds.

 

The foundation of Juan de Quintanaortuño, deeply rooted and his fame spread to such a point, that he found the support of the popes and of the kings. On April 26, 1138, Pope Innocent II granted his special protection to the monastery of San Nicolás de Ortega, in exchange for a census of four maravedis of gold every year.

 

Four years later, in January of the year 1142, the king of León, Alfonso VII, donated Juan and the family members who succeeded him. in the divine service, the realengo located in the Montes de Oca, between Ortega de Suso or Arriba and Ortega de Yuso or Abajo , So that with their fruits they would help the needs of the poor of Christ. He then points out the limits of the royal estate that is the object of the donation ... In addition, in the same diploma he grants Juan de Quintanaortuño the exemption from portazgo and freedom of pasture for their cattle throughout the kingdom.

This donation of Alfonso VII, which converted Juan de Quintanaortuño and his successors into jurisdictional lords in the preserve of the realengo donated, It was confirmed ten years later in the same terms by his son King Sancho III on March 14, 1152. This same monarch continued to favor the saint and his monastery and on August 12, 1155 he donated a villa named Ojuela , Whose limits it indicates, authorizing and favoring the poblamiento of the same with neighbors coming from other realengas towns.

This village of Ojuela, now reduced to a farm, is located in terms of Barrios de Colina, about 1,500 meters to the north of this population, away from the Camino de Santiago. Neither they were in the Way of Santiago, but something more meridional, the two towns mentioned in 1142: Ortega de Suso and Ortega of Yuso, whose names have been preserved up to the present day in the rewards or recognitions of the mountains applied to the payments we are going to describe

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In June of 1152 Juan de Quintanaortuño wrote his testament, in which he says Señor de Ortega, of the church of San Nicolás and of the house that with its patrimony and that of its brother Martin had built in via Sancti Iacobi; by this instrument he leaves all this to his relatives and to the monastery, so that they do not lack food and dressed in the monastery. With the consent of the regular canons, he disposes of his nephew Martín Estébanez as rector of the monastery upon his death. the death of this in turn happens to him Juan, the son of his brother Martín. He also recalled how the house was under the immediate protection of the Holy See, without the Bishop of Burgos could designate prior of the monastery without the consent of the regular canons who formed the community.

 

The Saint would still live for ten more years, because feeling severely ill in Nájera, he asked to be transferred to his monastery in Ortega where he died. June 2, 1163.

Despite Santo's testament, the monastery of San Juan de Ortega did not keep its direct dependence on the Holy See and its exemption of the bishop of Burgos, because only seven years later, Alfonso VIII, no doubt remembering that it had been founded by a donation realenga, incorporated it to the church of Burgos.

In this situation, inhabited by a community of regular canons and governed successively by eleven prelates, the monastery lasted for another 250 years, until the last of them died in December 1431, and the new prelate having chosen the only three monks who lived there, presented the name of the elect to the bishop of Burgos for confirmation.

 

News the prelate of Burgos of the lamentable material and spiritual state of the monastery, denied the confirmation and proposed to the monks Hieronymites, that also they followed the same Augustinian rule, that they took charge of San Juan de Ortega. It was annexed in 1432 to the Jeronimo monastery of Fresdelval, but found that San Juan de Ortega had enough assets to support twelve monks and a prior, was declared in 1434 independent Jerónimo monastery of Fresdelval.

Photo: Hostel of the monastery of San Juan de Ortega

Thus begins a second stage in the life of the monastery of San Juan de Ortega that will last until the confiscation, in which the Jeronimian community was expelled and monastery assets sold in public auction. After the convent and the hospital disappeared, the church, previously attended by the Hieronymites, became the parish of San Nicolás de Bari.

Next to the monastery, from the very days of San Juan de Ortega's life, an alberguería was built to welcome pilgrims crossing the Montes de Oca. She refers to Laffi in the seventeenth century ...

Today San Juan de Ortega with its magnificent Gothic church, and the artistic sepulcher of San Juan de Ortega ordered by Queen Isabella the Catholic, in thanksgiving for having obtained male succession through the intercession of the saint, constitutes the most characteristic Jacobean landmark in the province of Burgos. It has renewed the traditional hospitality and welcome to the pilgrims in their hostel.

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Texts: THE PATH OF SANTIAGO IN THE PROVINCE OF BURGOS

D. Gonzalo Martínez Díez / Editions of the Provincial Delegation of Burgos- 1998

★★★

Space nº 3.- CASTROJERIZ

Monastery of San Antón

 

Castrojeriz is, without doubt, the most important road village, after the city of Burgos, along the route of the Jacobean route in our province. The configuration of the Castrojeriz urban layout is determined not only by its topographic characteristics, but also and above all by its condition of Villa settled on the Camino de la peregrinación. Hence its longitudinal urbanism around a street or rua oriented in the direction of the route followed by the pilgrims.

 

The Camino de Santiago that we left in Hontanas dividing line penetrated in the municipality of Castrojeriz, about 150 meters to the right of the road from Castellanos to Castrojeriz, and was parallel to it separated from it by that hundred meters to merge with the road about 1,600 meters away from the municipal divide. From this point Road and road coincide, covered by the asphalt of this; so for 1,300 meters until you find the convent of San Antón, under whose arch both the historic Camino and the current road passed.

 

The convent of San Antón was the main encomienda and head of the Antoniian order throughout the Crown of Castile; the foundation of this convent is attributed to the emperor Alfonso VII the year 1146, although the oldest architectural remains that are preserved date of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The convent maintained a hospital, which was attended by the sick, especially those afflicted by the disease known in the Middle Ages as fire of San Antón, sacred fire, fire of sick or evil of the ardent ones, that impelled by the miraculous fame of San Antón, looked for the remedy for his ill in this antóniano convent.

 

This disease was like a leprosy or rather a very painful gangrene that according to the testimonies of the time, burned the entrails with a sensation of fire, gangrene of the extremities, sucking and blackening the flesh giving the sick the appearance of coals; hence the name of fire with which it was designated. This disease is already recorded in Europe in the 10th century, the year 945, and it spreads throughout the various countries. of the eleventh century. Today this disease has disappeared, because it was caused by the ergot of rye, which was consumed with bread made with this cereal and caused intense vasoconstrictions, both in the extremities and in the viscera.

 

The Antoniian order was born in Vienne, in the Dauphiné along the Rhône, as a result of having been cured of this disease the son of a noble of this region through the intercession of San Antonio; This noble, named Gastón, built a hospital in 1093 dedicated to the care of the sick of this disease, putting it under the invocation of said saint. This hospital was the cradle of a new religious order dedicated to the care of these patients, who having adopted the rule of St. Augustine, it spread rapidly throughout Europe and before the age of 50 founded the hospital convent of San Antón de Castrojeriz. Fernando IV exempted in 1304 of all chest to fifty settlers who came to dwell at the House of San Antón.

 

Because it was a real foundation, the convent was subject to the royal patronage, but the commander of San Antón, for being the entrusted Major of Castile, was designated by the Pope; then, the commander of San Antón appointed the commanders of the 23 encomiendas that depended on this house as their head. In addition, the community was authorized to collect alms for all the towns of the Burgos diocese for the support of the hospital; their friars were known for the red T o tau they wore over the habit, a sign they used to impose on pilgrims to invoke the intercession of San Antonio against the disease.

 

In the eighteenth century the convent of San Antón was in all its glory and cultivated his estates with twelve farmhouses and own servants, who lived next to the community, composed of 9 parents and 10 laymen. According to the Cadastro de la Ensenada, in 1752 the hospital of San Antón entered 839 reales per year through various censuses and had a cabin of 900 sheep heads that produced an income of 4,500 reales per year. The hospital building measured 36 vara in the background by 25 in width, and had two rooms: one for men with 8 beds and another for women with 4 beds; also had another low room with five bedrooms that because of its poor condition was replaced by a new room of 20 varas for 8. For the farm they were helped by four servants with a pair of oxen, three pairs of mules, two mares and a horse, and its inheritance extended by a wasteland of 642 obradas, equivalent each obrada, according to the measure customary in the region, to about 36 areas.

 

But, in spite of this relative splendor of San Antón, the year 1787 the king Carlos III obtained a pontifical bull by which the antoniiana order in Spain was suppressed; in application of that bull the king ordered the suppression of this convent in 1791, when it had 12 religious and the commander. The goods and income of San Antón were applied by royal decree of December 20, 1798 to the hospital of San Juan Bautista de Castrojeriz, according to what was requested four years before, in 1794, by the prelate of Burgos.

 

From San Antón the Camino de Santiago for about 650 meters followed the same route, today buried under the asphalt of the highway of Hontanas to Castrojeriz, until the junction with a road, which from Villaquirán de la Puebla went to Villajos; then the Camino marched about 450 meters to the left of the same road, very close to it. At the end of those 450 meters the Camino de Santiago crossed the road and parallel to it went towards the collegiate church of Our Lady del Manzano for 1,300 meters.

Photo: Ruins of the Convent of San Antón.

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Already, between the houses of the neighborhood, the Camino again made another inflection to the right to look for the facade of the Collegiate, along which it ran; then it continued towards the slope of the castle, between houses that aligned starting a street walk in the neighborhood of about 250 meters in length ... skirting the mount of the castle, towards the Real street ...

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The first news of the pilgrimage in Burgos date back to the reign of Alfonso VI and are linked to the establishment in Burgos of the French monk Adelelmo, who with the name of San Lesmes will become the patron of our city.

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Texts: THE PATH OF SANTIAGO IN THE PROVINCE OF BURGOS

D. Gonzalo Martínez Díez / Editions of the Provincial Delegation of Burgos- 1998

★★★

Space nº4.- PLAZA DE SAN JUAN IN BURGOS

Interior of the Monastery of San Juan

 

The pilgrims when entering Burgos walking along the Calzadas had a lot to admire and visit in the city that opened their doors to them; Until that moment it was the most important city they had encountered on the Spanish journey of their pilgrimage. Burgos, with León and Santiago de Compostela itself, were the three most monumental cities that were offered from the Pyrenees to the tomb of the Apostle, but between the three, the primacy, for its population, for its political significance, for its economic activity and for its monumental constructions we believe that corresponded to Burgos.

 

Before the pilgrims rose the city of Burgos with its walls, either the primitive ones or those that were being built along of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries; this second about 31,008 geometric feet, according to Barrio Villamor, and about three and a half kilometers, according to our calculations, it opened towards the exterior by eleven doors and was reinforced by 96 square and round towers. The city dominated from the first days of the city's birth a powerful castle that had been renewed, strengthening and embellishing according to the military needs and the tastes of each era.

 

HOSPITAL OF SAN JUAN EVANGELISTA

The first news of the pilgrimage in Burgos date from the reign of Alfonso VI and are linked to the establishment in Burgos of the French monk Adelelmo, that with the name of San Lesmes will become the patron of our city.

 

Among the news collected in the Life of Saint Lesmes, written by the monk Rudolph only a few decades after the death of the patron saint of Burgos, it is told how he arrived in Castile at the request of Queen Constance (1080-1092), and after having accompanied for some time the royal couple, Alfonso VI to retain him in his kingdom granted him a church, which the king himself had built next to the gates of the city of Burgos, under the invocation of St. John the Evangelist, for burial of the pilgrims who were heading to Santiago de Compostela, and a hospital or hospital, which would undoubtedly be close to the aforementioned church to.

After this first donation of the church and hospital, the biographer of San Lesmes places the episode of the legendary passage of the Tagus by Alfonso VI and his host. As the saint was ready to return to his church and hospital, the king proceeded to endow the aforementioned hospital with all the possessions regias between the Arlanzón and Vena rivers, among which was the church of San Juan Evangelista.

 

Among the preserved documentation of the monastery of San Juan Bautista the first document, dated November 3, 1091, contains the donation of a monastery under the invocation of San Juan, with the orchards that are between the Arlanzón and the Vena, to San Roberto de Casa Dei and Don Adalelmo. This diploma we believe documents the second donation narrated by the biographer of San Lesmes, that of the royal possessions located between the two rivers.

 

Among the same documents of the monastery of San Juan there is another second diploma of the same date, November 3, 1091, by the that King Alfonso VI donates to San Roberto and Don Adalelmo the chapel or church of San Juan Evangelista, located next to the monastery of San Juan Bautista, and the estates between the two water currents, the Arlanzón and the Vena. We believe that this document, which is only known by late copies of the thirteenth century, is a forgery forged in imitation of the previous authentic document and recording certain facts as was the donation of the church of San Juan Evangelista.

 

If we were to give faith to the biography of Saint Lesmes, the church of Saint John the Evangelist would have passed into the hands of the monk Adalelmo from before donation of the monastery of San Juan, dated 1091, but here we know how it was donated on the 22nd November 1085 to the hospital of the Emperor, in whose power was still the year 1128 when the hospital of the Emperor passed into the patrimonial of the bishop and the cathedral chapter.

 

With these data we can not admit as historical the donation of the church of San Juan Evangelista with its cemetery and shelter to San Lesmes ; this could only be incorporated into the patrimony of the monastery of San Juan after 1128. It already appears in 1243, when the monastery tries to justify its property by invoking the false document of 1091, written in imitation of the authentic

 

The only reliable data provided by the biography of San Lesmes in relation to the church of San Juan Evangelista are two: its destiny as burial of the pilgrims who died in Burgos and the existence of an alberguería attached to the church.

 

The first data is confirmed by the donation of this church to the hospital of the Emperor that expressly mentions the grave or cemetery; the second one is only found in the biography, and it is highly probable that next to the pilgrim cemetery there was a xenodochium or hospital for the same sick pilgrims.

 

The construction of this hospital by Alfonso VI shows us the importance that the pilgrimage was already acquiring at that time, when the same King has a church built for the pilgrims and so that those who died on the Camino in its path can be buried in it through Burgos, and next to the church a hospital or shelter for the same pilgrims.

 

We do not have any more news about this hospital that Alfonso VI allegedly delivered to San Lesmes, nor the documentation of the monastery of San Juan or the Emperor's Hospital contain no allusion to it. We believe that this hospital, which we can call San Juan Evangelista because of its relationship with the church of the same advocation, was giving prominence until disappearing replaced by the other great hospital that in the same city of Burgos had magnificently endowed the same Alfonso VI, and that would come to meet the needs of the pilgrims who passed through the city.

 

As a place of settlement of this hospital has been pointing out by local historians in the vicinity of the river Vena the site that later occupied the convent of San Ildefonso converted in the 19th century into an Artillery Park. More specifically there are indications that the church of San Juan Evangelista was located on the right bank of the Vena, outside the wall, next to the door of San Juan and the river bed, in front of the current church of San Lesmes; the hospital of the same name with its cemetery would be next to the missing church.

 

Decaida hospital activity of the first hospital of San Juan Evangelista, whose last known mention does not exceed the year 1296, and demolished the church and the hospital in 1387 because of its proximity to the wall, which could be reached from those buildings, construction will begin of the new church of San Lesmes on the other side of the river Vena, on the same site where it still stands today, but there is no news that a new hospital is being built to replace the downed one.

Photo: Plaza de San Juan. Burgos.

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Only in 1479 the construction of a new hospital begins, under the invocation of San Juan Bautista, in charge of the Benedictine monks of the same name. Pope Sixtus IV, by bull of October 12 of that same year, approved the new hospital because of the need that existed in Burgos for a good hospital to receive the pilgrims, a need that he did not consider covered with the small existing hospitals; for that reason the Benedictine monks decided to raise next to their convent a hospital with the same invocation of San Juan Bautista. The works of improvement and expansion of the new hospital continued until 1626, favored by the spiritual graces granted by the pontiffs to the benefactors.

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The hospital of San Juan Bautista became one of the great health care centers of the city of Burgos, equipped with spacious infirmaries with fifty beds and a very good pharmacy served by a monk of the monastery.

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Texts: THE PATH OF SANTIAGO IN THE PROVINCE OF BURGOS

D. Gonzalo Martínez Díez / Editions of the Provincial Delegation of Burgos- 1998